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no knowledge of wrongdoing, but our shareholders happy? >> the admission from rupert murdoch that he knew little or nothing about what was happening in certain parts of his business empire does not encourage confidence. >> a much anticipated event, but did it deliver? will anything change? >> i am an optimist. i think if they did not change, that we will get a more accountable and responsible press that is not capable of commitng criminal acts. >>> rupert murdoch and his son, james, faced a grilling as british politicians attempted to find out if they know anything about alleged phone hacking. both denied any knowledge of wrongdoing and were apologetic about what went on. he described the day as the most humble of his life. investors seemingly approved of what was said. news corp.'s share price rose by the close of sale tuesday. has the storm been weathered? has dominatedng politics here for weeks, but is it just a storm in a british teacup? a global tycoon like rupert murdoch must hope so. >> "the news of the world" is less than 1% of our company. we employ 350,000 people around the worl
, david cameron severed links with the murdoch's in the u.k. and there are cries for more investigation in the u.s. we speak to a senator calling for an inquiry. >> it is hard for me to understand how anybody could sanction doing some of the things they reportedly did. >> the saudi billionaire prince is news corp.'s second biggest shareholder. and we are deep in libya as the rebels opened another friend to get rid of gaddafi. -- open another front to get rid of gaddafi. it has been another dramatic week for rupert murdoch's news corp.. the fbi has involved itself and says it has opened a preliminary inquiry into allegations that news corp. journalists sought to gain access to the phone records of victims of the september 11th attacks. members of congress from both parties have called for an inquiry as to whether u.s. citizens were being targeted. i spoke to senator barbara boxer, who sent a letter to the department of justice asking for a full investigation. but first, how the crisis has spread. >> rupert murdoch's troubles may have broken out in the british corner of his empire, but th
to say that this is the most humbling day of my life. >> rupert murdoch and his son james are in the hot seat as british lawmakers grilled them up over what they knew about the phone hacking scandal. scheduled for execution, mark stroman is set to die by lethal injection. hoping to make a splash in the london olympics, with just a year left to go, we follow one british swimmer working hard to make the cut. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. shocked, appalled, a shame, the words that british -- that rupert murdoch used before british lawmakers. he was addressing the scandal which has sent shock waves through the metropolitan police. appearing beside his son, the senior murdoch apologized for the hurt that has been caused but maintained he was not responsible. the proceedings were interrupted by a demonstrator using a plateful of foam. >> the policemen are there to protect rupert in james murdoch, not taken in for questioning. that job fell to a committee of and peace. that tycoon's wife was behind him offering physical and emotional support. his son and on
they did. >> rose: rupert murdoch and london and paul farmer on haiti when we continue. r every story needs a hero we can all root for. who beats the odds and comes out on top. but this isn't just a hollywood storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is bned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, suppt small business. shop small. captiong snsored by rose communicaons from our studiosn new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the story of rupert mdoch and his media empire, which is under siege in london. the controversy arises from an ongoing phone hacking scandal and inappropriate relgtszships with the police. murdoch flew to london last en newscorp.ake comnd of the on sunyhe pepavowsinr ow tnhe newspaper involved in the scandal. the 168-year-old tabloid "news of the world." yeerday he whdrehis bid for the remaining shares of b sky b worth more than $12 million after mounting presre from the british government an
's royal family to its former prime minister, the allegations of hacking by rupert murdoch's media empire could have a global impact. east africa's drought is labeled the world's worst, but with so many in need, why is one refugee camp in kenya completely empty? and it is a question of identity. for native americans, the system has long helped define their tribes, but times have changed. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. another day and yet more extraordinary revelations in the hacking scandal surrounding rupert murdoch's media empire. first came a story that the news of the world reporters tried to buy top-secret information about the royal family from one of its protection officers. in a separate case, another murdoch paper is alleged to have targeted personal liberation of the former prime minister when he was chancellor. >> the head of state, the royal family, her and their security is the duty of the police in the royal protection branch. the integrity of those officers must surely be beyond a doubt, but this morning, i learned that "news of the worl
murdoch's business apierced before members of british parliament. the session last lead it hours and apologized but insisted they knew little or nothing about the illlegal phone hacking at the newspaper, news of the world. >> first of all i'd like to say as well how sorry i am and how sorry we are to particularly the victims of the illlegal voice mailing deceptions and their families. it's a matter of great regret of mine,y father and everyone at news corporation and these are standards these actionso nolive up to the standards that our company aspires to everywhere around the world. >> i would like to say this is the most humble day of my life. >> thank you. >> i became aware as it came out. th i was absolutely shocked, appalled and ashamed when i heard about the case only two weeks ago. >> charlie: here the end of the testimony rupert murdoch was asked if he considered resigning. >> have you considered resigning. >> no. >> why not? >> because i feel that people i trusted, not saying who. i don't know what level, they let me down and i think they behaved disgracefully and betray
titillation. then it was the murdoch era. things were changing. stratified english society was breaking down, and bang, we have that. there you are. is this going to do us any damage? rupert murdoch, this scandal? >> aside from the scandal, i killed that for the journalists. if, and when, the other shoe drops on the side of the ocean, eric holder's justice department is considering subpoenas. i do not think it will be as fun and dramatic as what we have seen out of london, but i do think there is another shoe to drop here. >> i think it has sort of appalled people how close we get to our sources. in england, this was out of control, where the government was being run by a news organization. politicians were terrified of the murdoch operation. some of my friends work for him and i know something about it. they took it for granted that they would go over to downing street to talk to the prime minister. you are never going to be able to pop into the oval office and tell the president what he should do. >> i will never be accused of being too cozy with the president. part of this story is who is
outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the person at the paper became fairly rotten and whose action shocked the nation. the paper, which has been printed for 168 years, became indelibly linked with the worst practices in journalism. james murdoch concluded it could not be amended. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. and that this company believes in. this company has been a great investor in journalism, a greater investor in media in general, and it is something that we believe very strongly and. clearly, certain activities did not live up to those standards. that is a matter of great regret for me per
'brien. pulling the plug on a major deal. rupert murdoch's news corporation ditches its bid for bskyb. mumbai under attack again. three explosions rocked india's financial capital, killing at least 21 people. and on at libya's front line, and to counter attack by colonel gaddafi's forces against rebels advancing on tripoli. >> you can hear it. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also a round the globe. the last few days have brought in a credible reversal of fortune for rupert murdoch's media empire. today came another blow. public and political pressure, news corporation withdrew its bid for bskyb. it is another casualty of the hacking firestorm. now prime minister david cameron has announced details of a far- reaching inquiry into recent events. for more on how the deal went bust, here is the bbc business editor. a warning, there is some flash photography. >> rupert murdoch, the great news mogul, in the news for the wrong reasons. putting on a brave face before one of the great humiliations' of his career, the abandonment for his attempt to take over bskyb. here is the explo
murdoch and the news corporation case in london. >> i tell you today is not the end of the story but with the res ig make of rebekah brooks on tuesday, this is a story which will run for months if not years with police investigations, judicial inquiries, lawsuits and any number of other threats still piling up against the mpany. but it's a significant day. >> the president's press conference, global implications for europe and th united states and the rupert--upert murdoch case. >>> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: storyline. it's happening every day, all across america. every time a storefront opens. or the midnight oil is burned. or when someone chases a dream, not just a dollar. they are small business owners. so if you wanna root for a real hero, support small business. shop small. additional funding provided by these funders: and by bloomberg a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. from our studiosn new york city, this is charlie rose. >> psident obama had a press conferen earlier th morning following five days of closed door
, "bbc world news." >> isolated and under pressure, rupert murdoch is deciding if he will give evidence to a british parliamentary committee on the phone hacking scandal. rebecca brooks has said she will go there. what is the risk to rupert murdoch's global empire, especially in the u.s.? the government asks if it is fit and proper to own bskyb. > >> hello and welcome to gmt. i am zeinab badawi. a memorial service for the afghan president's slain brother is marred by another attack on the same day the when it reveals civilian casualties and afghanistan have increased. as the funeral starts for big thumbs of the mumbai bomb attack, indian authorities blame terrorists for the blast that killed 20 and left dozens injured. hello and welcome to gmt. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and the former editor of the "news of the world" newspaper has agreed to be questioned by british mp's over the phone hacking scandal. the committee is taking further steps. rupert murdoch's news corp. has a knowledge it cannot be business as usual and it has dropped its full takeover bid, at least
and the role of mr. neil wallis, answered. let's be clear about what we heard yesterday, rupert murdoch said "politician i was closest to was gordon brown." let us remember, who was the adviser and gordon brown was the chancellor? >> we will want to hear the answers given by the prime minister. >> let us remember that the right honorable gentleman the was the adviser to gordon brown. let us remember during the last parliament that the information commissioner and ignored reports of the select committee, ignored the the failure of the police investigation. now we know which party was the slumber party and it wasn't a d everyone can see what he's trying to do, an attempt to play this for narrow party advantage. that has taken place over many years. the problem is one that the public expects us to stop playing with, but to rise to the occasion and do what is for the good of the country. order. mr. davis. >> under the previous labor government, damian green was arrested by the metropolitan police. the prime minister and home secretary were not notified of the details of that investigation. pass
committee of parliament earlier this week. rupert murdoch got a boost when a saudi prince that was the largest share of the company outside of the murdoch family voiced his support. nick, tell us, news corp shares are up for the first time in about two weeks. but the independent directors have hired their own lawyer. or why? >> we are getting mixed signals from the board. they have hired lawyers to protect shareholder value and to guard against maybe their own exposure. there have also been some reports that some of the more independent directors are thinking about ways in which rupert murdoch could give up his title of ceo at the company. this is a board that he controls pretty firmly. >> who is on the board? >> is a funny bunch. there are board members that cover a lot of ground. there is an opera singer. quite a range of experience. they are there because he wants them to be. he can control them through loyalty or maybe they spend their entire career there. >> will the board wants him to be succeeded by another? or is it time for someone outside the family? >> i think w
do not want to investigate what he has done. rupert murdoch issued a statement describing what had happened as deplorable and unacceptable. he stated that "our company must fully cooperate with the police and said that what happened under rebekah brooks' leadership." she was editor of the "news of the world," at the time some of the hacking. she was apparently away at the time. murdoch's enemies have long claimed that whoever is in power is the real puppet master. tonight, he, they, no one knows how this will end. >> joining me now from london is the deputy prime minister went tony blair was in power. 45 of his mobile phone messages were hacked into. this is a very sorry tale. it goes back to 2006 when your own messages were broken into. how evasive was that? >> the police kept in mind that that was so. i had to go to the court and force them to commit and setup a new inquiry. that is finding all of disinformation. the information was available before. why didn't the police act on it instead of the nine that my phone messages had been broken into? now we are learning the appalling
murdoch have andt( no7oot( about what happened at his big newspapers. ñrÑiÑi>> i have tor the answer,fá in my experience. he didxd not know what would be on the front page until we went about getting it. i havew3 never met rupert, but i have readt( james. çów3i know for example going years backxd when we put divine brown on the covere1, weñrÑh(!=u groups -- great school, but when rupert murdoch sought it he said that he founded distasteful. he wasçó very distant frome1 the (m 5"uát(v peration.clearly he let it carry on untid he had to come back to sort out the mess. okyou have got to say that rebecca brooks has got to be the worst editor in 7a.qeiweip @ i qsheÑi took the newspaper with a proud 160 year history the biggest!u newspaper in the speakingok world, and she closed it. e1i played Ñ part i and that. i did notxd expect it. and it was not a part of my game plan. i]i thoughte1 we might be able to t(r anticipate more. but that he might still go. we will wait to see how that pans out. !uxd>> thank y ÷ÑiÑi for your time. çóhere we have jeremy came in the studio
. >> allegations have called into question the ongoing takeover of firm.by rupert murdoch's >> the notion that today, next week, in september, this will be waived through by executives at news corp. does not meet the test of public consent. there's no doubt about that. >> the prime minister stop to his guns. he said the culture secretary has to follow legal guidelines. for the hundreds of staffers of "news of the world" -- the future is equally unclear. >> our political correspondent joins us from west mr. let's start with david cameron. this appeared to be as attempt to get out in front of this unfolding scandal, crisis. do you think he has succeeded? >> a very strong performance from david cameron. he talks about that practices in the press and almost doing a mea culpa. he still -- the question of andy coulson and why he hired him in the first place. he was asked time and time again what specific conversations he had with andy coulson. distanceng to put some between his former communications and himself. >> also, top people at the news international empire, including rebecca brooks. she
but faded. >> steve rosenberg, bbc news, moscow. >> the deputy prime minister has asked rupert murdoch to do the decent and sensible thing and to reconsider his bid to take over satellite television channel bskyb. clegg spoke after meeting the families of thithey schoolgirl -- the schoolgirl. this is a subject that's touching all of us, not only in the social media world, but also in the business world. >> absolutely. the pressure is unbelievable at the moment. i will talk about the share prices in a moment. this is what investors are looking at at the moment. the cultural cemetery of britain says he will not make a rush decision. we know he has written to regular -- written to regulators seeking advice. there's speculation that the takeover will be referred back to the competition commission, which could involve a lengthy investigation into whether mr. rupert murdoch, news corp., his management team would be proper to own bskyb. clegg made those comments a few moments ago. let's listen to what he said about this deal. >> the bskyb bid -- rupert murdoch is now in town in london. i would simp
by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. -- this could impact the rupert murdoch empire, i am joined by a senior business writer for bloomberg news. what can they say that will reassure shareholders? >> i think shareholders will want to hear that the worst is past. there's a sense among shareholders -- viavoice given rupert murdoch -- they have always given rupert murdoch a bit of a break. there has always been a bit of a murdoch discount thinking he is going to do what he wants to do and do not always what is best for shareholders. they've given him a break because he has a good view long- term of where the company is going. now he and his management team look like a group that is not in front of the news. they continue to get hammered by events. they are not prepared for it. they're constantly reacting. i think shareholders will want to see that the worst is behind them and they have their arms around this and know where it will go from here. >> is there any threat to the murdochs themselves? are their personal reputations so damaged it is now a liability for management? >> there i
, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc news america". herber murdoch said he will appear before a british lawmakers on the phone hacking scandal. the fbi starts its own investigation in the u.s. the airline forced into hiding. a crackdown in syria continues, we cross the border to get a look at how thousands of families are living. paying a hefty price for some of jane austen's pages. an early manuscript is in the hands of the highest bidder. let me start by telling you to mark your calendars. next tuesday the embattled media titan rupert murdoch and his heir apparent jane will appear before british lawmakers. sending shock waves far and wide. the fbi has opened an investigation into allegations that murdoch's news corp. saw to hack into the phones of september 11 victims. we start tonight's coverage with this report from our deputy political editor. >> parliament has costumed the news of the -- to answer the questions of the mp's of why so many were hacked. >> my message to rebekah brooks is do the decent thing. it cannot hide away from this level of public english. >> they were reluctan
brown claimed in an interview that the "sunday times" also part of the murdoch empire hire criminals to obtain the information. there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon that downing street with rupert's starter next to him and the top editor on the right. for years, team brown stayed close to t murdoch. no more. peace miles fell away. gordon brown accused them and their newspaper of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> some were getting information from my lawyers. like a tax attorney said that medical records have been broken into. i do not tell how all of this happened. in two instances, there is absolute proof that news international, was involved in hiring people to get this information. ith people that the work wa our criminals. >> this is the editor of "the sunday times." in a statement tonight, they believe ethanol law was broken, no criminal was used edie story he attacked the way it reported that his youngest son was suffering from cystic fibrosis. the revelation was not legitimate. they left him -- >> in tears. that is done something to be broadcast
was, of course, the committee with the murdochs and rebekah brooks, but i went to the home affairs committee and sat there when the -- when the just outgoing commissioner of police and the assistant commissioner, also outgoing, and the press officer talked about their relations with the press. it was really truly extraordinary. it wasn't -- it wasn't just the statistic lionel just quoted about the -- these, you know,0 members of 45 strong team being ex-news international journalists, it was things like 30% of paul stevenson's meetings over a five-year period had been meetings with the media had been with news international journalists. it's coming out in recent days that somebody who was a senior executive at the "news of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really ext
released on bail following her rest yesterday. this comes as a she, rupert murdoch, and his son, james, are due to give evidence tomorrow. >> david cameron is being forced to tackle this. >> dog by the phone hacking scandal, the details that the school girl may have had her phone hat, in afghanistan, the questions keep coming about regarding his judgment. david cameron is trying to handle this by asking parliament to sit for an extra day this week. they will have their chance to question him, as we can see the story is not going away and the opposition is going to step up their demands. >> of course, there were a series of people that were going to appear that were going to be scrutinized further. were they? >> tuesday shaping up to be a very big day in parliament. in the morning we are expecting a senior policeman, including the one that put it last night, to appear before the committee. they will be questioned and questioned again about this cozy relationship. also, of course, at the handling of the original investigations into phone hacking. the biggest set piece will be in the afte
and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shocking, that someone could do this, actually knowing the police were trying to find this person and trying to
and now she is rupert murdoch that a chief executive in the u.k. and he is involved in a controversial move to take colds -- full control of bskyb. last night the labor leaders said it is beyond believe anyone would undertake such a cruel and immoral act. but some in parliament say that political leaders have been too easily cowled by the power of the murdoch empire. >> it is time they acted. politicians are frightened of a news international and they need to act. >> there were calls for a full judge-led inquiry into what happened in the case and many others. >> president hugo chavez of venezuela told state television he doesn't expect to attend tuesday that the celebrations marking the 20th anniversary of independence from spain. he made a surprise return from cuba where it he spent nearly a month getting cancer treatment. he addressed thousands of his supporters from his balcony vowing he would win the battle to regain his health. >> a triumphant return for a grateful president. hugo chavez greeted thousands of supporters in his first public appearance in several weeks, thanking them
investigating his connections. and rupert murdoch his son james and rebekah brooks are preparing for a grilling by m.p.'s in about a half hour's time. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington and 9:00 p.m. a canberra and midday here at westminster where he air is abuzz with expectation. in a few minutes two figures in the british police are about to face a grilling from m. pfpp.'s known as john yates a long-time controversial figure emergency the premises. it has been two weeks of absolute turbulence and crisis for the political elite here, for the press and for the police. some say it is overblown, some saying where are we going next, some saying is the prime minister himself under threat. he is in africa on a trade been n, a trip he has criticized for making and has had to cut short. he is extending the british by one day so he can come back and face questions about his links with the murdoch empire. first up, in the next few minutes we will be focused on the police and what were their links with news international. the committee is made up of a cross party selection of members of parliament and has
this and did to regard -- about this bid. >> he is accused him of hiding their relationships with the murdoch empire. >> i have set out all the contrast to the party opposite, but i can tell you, i have never held a slumber party. >> david cameron says he has an old-fashioned view that a man is innocent until proven guilty, but today he tried to separate his fate from andy. >> for more on the fallout and the impact it continues to have, i spoke to the chief political correspondent for "the guardian newspaper" in london. did he do enough today to stop questions about his judgment? >> he certainly did announce to south -- did enough to satisfy his party curio reaching his party. he was meant to finish with a trip to south sudan. he did about short, but conservative mps were delightful. there was a meeting, and they did die for a long time. he faces a difficult challenge in persuading the labour party. they are keeping the pressure of on the two areas highlighted. point number one, why did you and bring andy into downing street last year when there were allegations that he knew, and did you talk
. >>> in others news, the church of england said this week it may sell its $6 million share in rupert murdoch news corporation can unless the organization conducts a full and open inquiry into the recent phone hacking scandal. church leaders called the actions of murdoch's british tabloid, the news of the world, "utterly reprehensible and unethical. and finally, during its coverage of last month's u.s. open golf tournament, nbc ran a montage that included the pledge of allegiance to the flag. most of it. it left out the words "under god, indivisible. members of congress, among others, complained and nbc this week formally apologized. it said there was nothing ideological about the omission, and that the employees involved have been reprimanded. that's our program for now. i'm bob abernethy. you can follow us on twitter and facebook, find us on youtube, and watch us anytime, anywhere on smart phones and iphones. there's also much more on our web site. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available -- join us at pbs. org. as we leave you, music from
happens again. >> we have an over-familiar relationship with other rupert murdoch newspaper group in particular. only a judge can get to the truth because the politicians have left these families behind >> -- behind. >> the parent company, news international, says that it is cooperating with the the police. >> let's speak with our political correspondent. the shock here in the u.k. is quite understanding, is it not? >> there is that sense of moral revulsion that we heard from some parliamentarians yesterday. the private investigator at the center of it had to release a statement saying that he was very sorry for any upset that he caused. he attempted to explain this away in the context of the culture. saying that he was under constant pressure for stories. he was not exactly trying to excuse what he had done, but he did try to put the blame on those who were higher up. >> weekend -- we only have to look at the prime minister's questions to see the debate. >> and we are no longer talking about politicians and celebrities. we are talking about terrorist victims, murder victims, havi
rocked the murdoch media empire. police have told the mother of a child that she was on the list of people whose phone may have been hacked. notes of her phone number was on an investigate's notes. the bbc's report. >> perhaps it seemed this astonishing affair no longer had the reputation to shock. but the mother who worked alongside the news of the world alongside its former editor was all along one of its victims. sarah payne's charity was contacted last night to be told her details were in the notebooks of the phone hacker. it says "we are all deeply disappointed and we are just working to get her through it." the last night of "the news of the world" and it's last edition. sarah payne had previously been told she was not a hacking victim. she had been asked to write a last article. she described the paper as an old friend. >> a series of tragic news stories -- >> and rebecca brooks, former editor, describes sarah payne as her dear friend. the two worked together to campaign for "sarah's law," the public right to know where pedophiles are living. tonight rebecca said these all
and a 20% increase in a dividend boost. the firm announced its keeping rupert murdoch's son, james, on as chairman. a quick look at the markets. just want to show you the currency markets. we only have four days to go until the debt deadline hits. gold is still above the $1,600 a troy ounce mark. that's what the asian markets have been doing today. one big story -- the worry over the u.s. especially for japan, the weaker dollar means a stronger yen and at its corporate japan like nothing else. it's a big problem at the moment. >> good to see him appear get its -- good to see you. general abdel fattah younes was shot dead by what has been described as an armed gang as he prepared to appear before a judicial committee. the identity and motive of the gang has not been disclosed. our world affairs correspondent sent this report. >> in the early moments of this complex, the front lines in eastern libya were constantly shifting. one morning on the road to b rega, the commander showed up, boosting morale. general abdel fattah younes was an important defector from colonel gaddafi's regime.
," a murdoch paper, for having published stories that claim she's a prostitute. so she wanted to come out and say, look, most of the world, maybe not in the united states, but most of the world knows my name. most people know who i am, my daughter, 15 years old, is reading stories in the "new york post" that say i'm a prostitute. i think it's time to come out and defend myself in public and i think that's exactly why she did it. >> christopher dickie, thank you very much for joining us. now to the up in nuptials whiche been taking place across new york. yesterday, the state became the largest in the u.s. to recognize gay marriage and officials are hoping that with all of those weddings, the economy will be given a much-needed boost. the bbc's laura travallian went to meet happy couples. >> last minute caches on the big day for hundreds of same-sex couples queuing up in the sweltering heat, this was a moment to treasure. in a new york first, alese and her fiancee planned a double wedding with alese's brother and his partner. >> a month ago on the couch because i don't think you realize how
the years. are you suggesting that the story of murdoch's possible downfall is yet another tabloid story, a tabloid story about a tabloid story? >> rose: tt's moreshakespearean. >> perhaps. >> rose: so tell me about joyce. w did you know about her? >> i read a lot of newspapers. this was an a.p. service wire story about a woman who had cloned her -- >> rose: dog.-- pit bull named , produced five -- five clones. her name is bernand mckinney, but at the bottom of the article they mentioned she might have been involved -- she might be joyce mckinney, she might involved in a 30-year-old sex and chain story. >> rose: sex and chain?sex and . >> rose: chained to a bed?yes. and it caught my attention. i ended up making a movie about it. >> rose: were you looking for ay jumped up at you? >> i'm always looking for stories. i mean, that's nothing unusual. this story jumped out at me. i had been thinking of doing a tabloid story. that had been on my mind. one of the characters in my movie "tabloid" describes that is t perfect tablo story. i believe they'r absolutely correct. >> rose: when makes the
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)